Smiling child's hand shows the fallen out small white tooth close-up

Celebrate National Tooth Fairy Day on August 22

Happy National Tooth Fairy Day, Palos Heights Family Dental logoHow did you lose your first tooth as a kid? Did you tie a string around it and pull it out on your own? What about the tooth fairy—were you so excited?

You might be wondering what this trip down memory lane is all about. August 22 is National Tooth Fairy Day! Let’s learn more about the history behind the tradition, the value of a tooth and some ideas for how you can celebrate the day with your family.

A History of the Tooth Fairy

At first, it might seem a little hard to believe that a bunch of hefty, chain mail-wearing, axe-wielding Vikings created the adorable Tooth Fairy that American kids love and adore today. But the Vikings considered teeth good luck and liked to wear teeth necklaces in battle. They also paid their children for the baby teeth they lost—which is how they were credited for the Tooth Fairy idea.

But the first written American reference was in a 1908 Chicago Tribune article. The author reassures parents of even the most stubborn children who lose their “milk teeth” that they will leave them under their pillows at bedtime for the Tooth Fairy who, “will come in the night and take it away, and in its place will leave some little gift.”

The Tooth Fairy and Tooth Rates

When you were a kid, how much money did the Tooth Fairy leave under your pillow? Was it just loose coins for your loose tooth?

Smiling child's hand shows the fallen out small white tooth close-up
According to the American Dental Association, learning about the Tooth Fairy is also a great time to help kids learn more about taking care of their teeth.

In a USA Today article, 46% of parents said the amount of cash they have on hand determines the amount they leave for their kids. Another 31% of parents said their kids’ age determines the tooth’s value. In Illinois, children received an average of $3.41 per tooth from the Tooth Fairy.

In general, children lose their first baby tooth around age 6, and the last somewhere between ages 10 and 12.

Beyond tradition, learning about the Tooth Fairy is also a great time to help kids learn more about taking care of their teeth, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). The association offers a variety of free resources to help families welcome the Tooth Fairy, including printables for creating receipts, scrapbooks and more.

Gift Options for a Magical Visit

The Tooth Fairy concept may not excite some parents if their kids complain about the amount of money they receive compared to their friends. Or if it’s a task just to remember the Tooth Fairy for their child among a heap of other responsibilities.

If money under your child’s pillow doesn’t appeal to you, you could leave a book or other item instead. The nonprofit, America’s Tooth Fairy, which helps ensure children have access to dental care, has more ideas.

Whether you’re short on cash or just looking to do something different, you can still make a Tooth Fairy visit magical by gifting:

We hope you have a magical National Tooth Fairy Day with your family!

To schedule your next visit, complete our contact form or call our office at (708) 448-­7588.

Celebrate National Tooth Fairy Day on August 22 was last modified: August 22nd, 2022 by Palos Heights Family Dental